So here’s the rest of the rest.

• The President met with Senate leaders of both parties today, and while there looks to be little hope for anything but gridlock, the Administration still believes there’s room for a “significant deal.” Tim Geithner sounds positive about that as well. Coming out of the talks with Harry Reid were some target numbers: a 4:1 split between spending and revenue. And that’s the DEMOCRAT’S position.

• Of course, Republicans would rather there be no tax increases whatsoever in the deal, although they have softened on the idea of user fees and other revenue-generating ideas. These are small pools from which to draw, however.

• Oh, and economic stimulus? Fuhgettaboutit.

• We are in the 100th day of the Libya campaign, with little hope for a resolution. The International Criminal Court issued an arrest warrant for Moammar Gadhafi, but that’s not likely to remove him from power. Critics like Sen. Jim Webb are frustrated by the President’s handling of the situation.

Another EPA delay on regulations to limit pollution, at least the third I can think of this year. Predictably, Republicans still think the timelines are too short.

• The Sheriff of Dane County has taken over the investigation into the choking incident between Wisconsin Supreme Court Justices David Prosser and Ann Walsh Bradley. The Wisconsin Judicial Commission is also investigating.

• David Sirota notes the divide between how other developed nations are handling financial reform, and how it’s going in the US.

• The problem is that the halt in DREAMer deportations is not stated policy, and kids are taken almost all the way through the process before being pulled from the brink. There’s too much anecdotal evidence to the contrary to say there is a consistent no-deportation policy.

• Georgia’s anti-immigration law has been partially struck down by a federal judge. These anti-immigration laws keep hitting these roadblocks.

• US Consumer spending bottomed out in May, another bad sign for a weak economy.

• French banks agreed to a rollover of Greek debt, which gives the second bailout (or, if you prefer, delay of the Great Reckoning) a chance of working temporarily. But the Greek Parliament has to pass that austerity/privatization plan. Two days of protests are scheduled.

• The Chairman of the Afghan Central Bank just resigned because he didn’t feel safe in Kabul anymore. This is fallout from the depressing Kabul Bank scandal.

• Joe Biden’s power may be growing on foreign policy, but it’s a game of inches. The drawdown in Afghanistan remains agonizingly slow, and despite the “end of the combat mission” in Iraq soldiers are dying there at the fastest rate in two years.

• The Chair of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission tried to reassure the public about the Nebraska nuclear plant. Incidentally, while many countries are pulling back from nuclear power, Nicolas Sarkozy of France is investing in it.

• The tea party debt panel should be fun. Looking forward to all the technical talk about bend points and chained CPI.

Blago has been found guilty on 17 counts of corruption. He did a very poor job of hiding his efforts at profiting from public office.

• Disturbing undercover video from North Korea.

• The states that have cut the most spending from 2007-2010 have also lost the most jobs.

• Erik Wemple’s media crit blog at the Washington Post could be interesting.

• Tim Pawlenty’s going for the neocon vote. It’s the only leg of the stool available to him.

• They don’t even like attacks on teachers in Tennessee, let alone anywhere else.

• A news blog in Rockville, Maryland, just went all Facebook. I could see this as a trend.

• Behind the scenes on that rainbow-colored Empire State Building after the marriage equality vote Friday night. Apparently it coincided with Pride Weekend in New York, so the preparations were already in place. And Bob Weir had something to do with it.

Zero-waste grocery store hits Austin, Texas. No packaging involved.

• The household appliance that sucks up the most energy is your DVR.