Don’t forget about the Nationwide Day of Mass Action tomorrow. I will be Occupying a dentist’s chair in the morning, unfortunately, and missing the LA event, which is at 7am.

• The first day of the Scott Walker recall in Wisconsin got off to a good start, especially with a new poll showing 58% support for the recall. But Walker seems to have his talking points down pat, and I could actually see them being effective, regardless of the truth contained therein.

• The CBO assessed different job proposals, and found simply that the Democratic ones work better. Just to add to this, the worst jobs plan of all is the repatriation tax holiday, which has almost no effect.

• The Blue Dogs endorse the balanced budget amendment. Good thing their ranks are gradually being culled.

• Getting closer to civil war in Syria, with this attack on a military base by defectors from the Army.

• Jeff Madrick and Frank Partnoy take a look at bank prosecutions, and why they haven’t happened. It’s a good companion piece to this.

• Big California Supreme Court ruling on standing in the Prop 8 case coming down tomorrow. If the Supreme Court rules that the defendant-intervenors cannot appeal, marriage equality will actually be a reality in the state again. But that’s not the preferred outcome to set a precedent for the whole nation.

• Arthur Delaney and Matt Sledge on the growing Occupy Homes movement.

• We’re getting to the point where there will only be ghettos and mansions in America.

• Jeb Hensarling’s idea of a bipartisan compromise is $3.3 trillion in tax cuts from current law, in exchange for enacting Mitt Romney’s Medicare platform.

• On what planet is it ethical to have two of the Supreme Court judges determining the health care case dining with members of one of the parties in the lawsuit?

• Now AIG doesn’t want to participate in the new HARP refinancing guidelines because of the changes to mortgage insurance. Hey, what’s the government ever done for AIG, anyway?

• As tuition rates rise again in California, the Occupy Cal movement explains how regents are profiting off of student debt.

• Adam Serwer looks at how indefinite detention may get folded into the defense appropriations bill.

• Michael Bloomberg has a long history of repressing freedom of speech and assembly.

• There is no such thing as a fracking jobs boom.

• David Frum, Bush speechwriter and author of “An End to Evil,” admits the war in Iraq was a mistake.

• BP may have to pay more in penalties for the oil spill disaster last year after losing two key rulings in court.

• The President actually managed to mention climate change when he was thousands of miles away in a press conference in Australia.

• Hamid Karzai’s loya jirga was predictably unpredictable. He came out in support of a security pact with the United States, but then said that night raids should end and US prisons should close down.

• The pizza as a vegetable thing is really insane, as Pam Spaulding says. One of the leading pieces of legislation touted as part of the Obama record, by the way, is a child nutrition bill.

• Steve Singiser eviscerates Rasmussen in their first poll of the cycle.

• Rep. Peter King advances the dirty hippie narrative on Occupy Wall Street. Karl Rove doesn’t seem happy with the protesters either. I love him yelling “Who gave you the right to occupy America?”

• Tea Party leaders have finally had enough with Herman Cain. Oh yeah, I’d like to see them answer tough questions like “what did you think of Libya?”

• Arrests in the demonstrations against Alabama’s draconian anti-immigration law picked up at least two undocumented students.

• Republican freshmen can’t seem to raise much money.

Bullets keep hitting the White House.

• The last poll had him in a dead heat in Iowa, so no, I don’t think you can write off Ron Paul at all. After Cain finishes his nosedive and Gingrich starts his, there won’t be a lot of candidates left.

• The Penn State scandal overshadows the fact that child sex abuse is down 55% since 1992.

• Say hello to your new elements on the periodic table.