Gotta go to Clooney’s house. OK, outside it. And stay tuned for some EXCITING ROUNDUP NEWS tomorrow.

• Mega-banks are trying to drag President Obama’s Fed picks across the finish line, which tells you something about their quality. But David Vitter and the Republicans won’t budge on the selections, which shows you just how far around the bend they’ve gone.

• In Colorado, Republicans tried to run out the clock on a civil unions bill, but John Hickenlooper ordered a special session to finish the legislature’s work. This is another example of how mainstream Democrats are far more willing to go to the mat over a social issue than an economic one.

• Here’s Aaron Krager’s dispatch from the Bank of America shareholder’s meeting yesterday.

• Another slap on the wrist in the mortgage mess: Deutsche Bank settled a lawsuit for $200 million over their subsidiary MortgageIT submitting loans for a decade for FHA eligibility that did not meet the underwriting guidelines.

• CFPB wants to limit mortgage origination fees, which is a spectacular idea. These fees are almost entirely unregulated and can vary wildly from one loan to the next.

• ENDA won’t pass this year, but it’s significant that, in the wake of President Obama’s announcement on marriage equality, two Republicans have joined Democrats in calling for hearings on the anti-discrimination bill.

• In the first poll since the elections in Greece, Syriza, or the Radical Coalition of the Left, now leads all parties in the vote. A new election is expected June 17.

• For the last time, there has been austerity in Europe. And it’s done nothing good.

• Yves Smith is pretty brutal on that Eric Schneiderman interview with Chris Hayes. It is undeniably true that he confines himself to friendly interview venues.

• Sadly, I’m not sure this effort to reform the NDAA has the votes. But expect quite a bit more on it as the defense authorization bill comes up again.

• Spain had a housing bubble, and their crisis is not so much about public debt as it is about private debt and banking, which has shocked the economy and caused unemployment to soar.

• Weird that Putin abruptly cancelled a routine trip to the US.

• Felix Salmon’s case for principal reductions is quite good, even if he’s a bit too credulous about Bank of America’s announcement on mailing letters to prospective eligible borrowers on principal reduction.

• A bit shocking that a bank analyst is actually calling for helicopter drops of money for the Eurozone. We could use that too!

• This story about Mitt Romney bullying an effeminate classmate while at prep school in 1965 is all over the news. I don’t really have much to say about it, I’m more worried about what politicians do in 2012 than 1965.

• This is much better from Harry Reid than yesterday’s truly weird statement on marriage equality. The fact that John Boehner is running away from the question suggests that its potency as a wedge issue has leveled off.

• The big box stores have finally figured out how to sell solar. I think this industry, at least for home installation, is about to take off.

• This new executive order to cut “unnecessary regulations” follows a familiar pattern of a greater concern about pruning old regulations than creating new ones where there are needs to protect workers and consumers.

• Fannie Mae says they turned a profit in the first quarter, so score another one for the housing bears, who see a market turnaround just around the corner.

• The backlash to the war on women collects a scalp in North Carolina.

• The USDA acts to increase oversight over puppy mills. Change I can believe in.

• Kim Jong-un is right, that roller coaster totally sucks.

• Let me just say that I see a lot of familiarities in this profile of Business Insider’s Joe Weisenthal. Especially that picture, as Mrs. D-Day can confirm.

• Our long national nightmare is over: Michele Bachmann is no longer a Swiss citizen. We got her back!