In Russia, the all-girl punk band Pussy Riot has been found guilty of protesting Vladimir Putin at a cathedral in Moscow. The charge could carry up to three years in prison.

The court case has generated international outrage about the curtailing of free speech. Prosecutors in Russia argued that Pussy Riot’s anti-Putin “punk prayer” violated religious strictures, and the court agreed. The specific charge is “hooliganism motivated by religious hatred.”

The Pussy Riot punk group singers, who have been found guilty by the Khamovnichesky Court in Moscow, were motivated by hatred and religious enmity, the court verdict says.

“The Pussy Riot singers colluded under unestablished circumstances, for the purpose of offensively violating public peace in a sign of flagrant disrespect for citizens,” the court said in a verdict being pronounced on Friday.

The women were motivated by religious enmity and hatred, and acted provocatively and in an insulting manner inside a religious building in the presence of a large number of believers,” the court said.

Activists massed outside the courtroom, chanting “Freedom to Political Prisoners.” Police made arrests of the protesters, including chess champion and former Presidential candidate Gary Kasparov. Russian opposition leader Sergey Udaltsov was detained as well. A number of solidarity protests have taken place across Europe today.

The judge is actually still delivering the verdict from the bench, but it’s clear at this point that Pussy Riot has been found guilty.

The case highlights the repression of free speech in Putin’s Russia, and has become a cause célébre for those wishing to end the creeping authoritarianism in the country. Protest has basically been criminalized in Russia. In a separate ruling, gay pride parades have been banned in Moscow for 100 years.

UPDATE: Each member of the band has been sentenced to two years in prison.