Chicago has experienced one of its bloodiest weekends yet under “Murder Mayor” Rahm Emanuel with 46 people shot and at least 7 dead. Questions are now being raised as to whether Emanuel can govern the city.

At least 34 people were shot — seven of them fatally — Saturday afternoon through Father’s Day Sunday, stretching from 94th Street and Loomis Avenue on the South Side up to about North Avenue and North Pulaski Road on the Northwest Side, according to authorities. The youngest person killed during one of the bloodiest weekends in Chicago this year, 15-year-old Michael Westley, was fatally shot by a police officer Sunday night.

Shootings from Friday afternoon into Saturday left another 13 people shot, 1 fatally. The combined tally resulted in 47 people shot, and seven killed this weekend. Last year at about the same time, there were 53 people shot, nine fatally in one weekend.

Rahmbo’s utter failure to rein in street violence is just one of many problems plaguing his administration as members of the long dominant Chicago machine grouse behind the scenes and former coalition partners openly rebel.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel cakewalked into office, from his former position as the White House chief of staff to President Obama, to succeed the two-decade reign of Richard M. Daley. Like Daley, Emanuel faced weak opponents who grumbled at his supersize war chest, thickly padded by financiers from Hollywood to Wall Street. But unlike Daley, Emanuel promised two things Chicagoans do not hear often: pledges for more government transparency, and to make “tough choices” to fix the city’s ballooning budget deficit.

Now, midway into his inaugural term, the honeymoon is over. Emanuel faces scrutiny from groups Daley never alienated: public sector unions, liberal progressives and minority coalitions on the city’s South and West side. Since his election, Emanuel’s approval numbers started dropping, and some are charging him as racist — a “murder mayor” deaf to the marginalized swaths of Chicago suffering from escalating street violence, inadequate transit and the largest mass school closing in U.S. history. While he reigns as mayor in a city traditionally ruled by Democrats, many consider him a Republican in donkey blue clothing, who, like Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R), swept into office and immediately hauled out the budget cleaver.

Emanuel’s tactics as well as his policies also make one recall Scott Walker such as Emanuel being tied to a firm that paid Tea Partiers to attack the Chicago Teachers Union.

And, like Walker, Emanuel’s reputation for fiscal discipline is mostly a facade to cover for special interest favor trading. While Emanuel is trying to close public schools he offered corporate welfare to campaign contributor Morgan Stanley. While claiming to reform the disastrous parking meter privatization scheme Mayor Emanuel actually ended up conceding $517 million more money to the firm. Mayor 1% strikes again.

The real issue for the people of Chicago now is finding a replacement for a man both unwilling and unable to govern democratically or effectively.