If only it was the first time. A woman in Ohio is trying to get her possessions back after a bank broke into her house and stole them. The bank had the wrong address but still broke in and took her belongings.

An Vinton County woman is looking to get her belongings back after a bank incorrectly broke into her house and took them. Katie Barnett says that the First National Bank in Wellston foreclosed on her house, even though it was not her bank. “They repossessed my house on accident, thinking it was the house across the street,” Barnett said.

Barnett, who had been away from the house for about two weeks, said she had to crawl through the window of her own house in order to get in after she used her own key that did not work. Some of the items in her house had been hauled away, others were sold, given away and trashed.

So someone goes away for two weeks and because a bank doesn’t know how to read a map their property gets sold, trashed, and hauled away? Not sure that’s what the founding fathers had in mind.

But don’t worry the bank did its due diligence – her lawn wasn’t mowed, so they knew they had the right house. Talk about capricious tyranny.

It turns out the bank sent someone to repossess the house located across the street from Barnett’s house, but by mistake broke into hers instead. “They told me that the GPS led them to my house,” Barnett said. “My grass hadn’t been mowed and they just assumed.” She called the McArthur Police about the incident, but weeks later, the chief announced the case was closed.Barnett said that according to the bank president, this was the first time something like this has happened.

She presented him with an $18,000 estimate to replace the losses, but the president refused to pay. “He got very firm with me and said, ‘We’re not paying you retail here, that’s just the way it is,’” Barnett said. “I did not tell them to come in my house and make me an offer. They took my stuff and I want it back.”

Of course, why should the bank have to pay for the property it stole? It’s about personal responsibility, Barnett should have known that she has to have her lawn mowed at all times and made sure that bank agents she never met knew how to use a GPS correctly. As Reagan would say, she is poor by choice.

The police have closed the case and will not be helping Barnett. The police apparently exist to help the banks foreclose on people not help the people foreclosed on incorrectly. Barnett has not been made whole but she is free, and freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose (because the banks stole it).

Here is First National CEO Anthony Thorne’s formal statement.