Despite the NSA demanding the public just trust them, the agency itself seems to have some trust issues. In the wake of the Snowden leak, NSA Director Keith Alexander says he plans to eliminate 90% of the agency’s system administrators in hopes of preventing future leaks.

Keith Alexander, the director of the NSA, the U.S. spy agency charged with monitoring foreign electronic communications, told a cybersecurity conference in New York City that automating much of the work would improve security.

“What we’re in the process of doing – not fast enough – is reducing our system administrators by about 90 percent,” he said.

What does it say about a system where 9 out of 10 workers in a job can be eliminated at the drop of a black hat? There presumably was a reason these people were employed, wasn’t there?

“At the end of the day it’s about people and trust,” Alexander said. He again defended his agency’s conduct, much of which he said had been “grossly mischaracterized” by the press. “No one has willfully or knowingly disobeyed the law or tried to invade your civil liberties or privacies,” he said. “There were no mistakes like that at all.”

He told his audience to “get the facts” and make up their own minds, adding that the agency itself could do more to enable this: “We’ve got to push out more, I recognize that,” he said.

Get the facts? The only way the public has gotten any facts at all is from the leaks Alexander is fighting against. General Alexander wants the public to be completely in the dark, then when information is leaked, he wants to be able to credibly denounce the press and public reaction as lacking the information he helped hide. Talk about having it both ways. Try again Keith.

It might also be worth noting that Snowden was trained to be more than a system administrator by the NSA itself. So if this is an attempt to dress up a program already in the works as a response to the Snowden leaks it could not be more ineffectual.