Mary Landrieu Senate portrait.jpg

Senator Mary Landrieu

Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu has generally been considered the more well behaved senator from the state given her counterpart is David Vitter. But now questions are being raised about Landrieu’s residency claims as to whether she actually lives in the state of Louisiana – a requirement to represent the state in the US Senate under Louisiana law.

According to records reviewed by the Washington Post, Landrieu really lives in DC in a $2.5 million home she and her husband built. In fact, Landrieu listed the DC home as her address when filing her candidacy for reelection with the Federal Election Commission despite listing her parent’s home in Louisiana as her residence with LA state authorities.

Neighbors told WaPo they believe Senator Landrieu lives in DC and have not seen her at the residence though they said they did see her parents and brother Mitch Landrieu who also serves as the mayor of New Orleans.

On a statement of candidacy Landrieu filed with the Federal Election Commission in January, she listed her Capitol Hill home as her address. But when qualifying for the ballot in Louisiana last week, she listed the family’s raised-basement home here on South Prieur Street…

For Landrieu, there are hazardous parallels to other recent cases in which residency questions have dogged incumbents. Former senator Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.) lost reelection in 2012 after reports that he stayed in hotels when he returned to Indiana, while Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) is drawing flack this year for not having a home of his own in Kansas and listing a donor’s house as his voting address.

While fundraising and other obligations keep members of Congress in DC a good part of the year, many states require that the representatives live in the state or district they are supposed to be representing.

The residency question in Louisiana is handled by a state prosecutor or a court case from an interested party. Some of Landrieu’s opponents are reportedly considering just such a challenge. Senator Landrieu has said, through an attorney, that she is in compliance with the law.

Photo from US Senate under public domain.